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Our Dore Experience


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#1 ~ lesley ~

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 10:17 AM

Hi , I have been posting here for over a year now. I decided to put my son on the Dore Programme, he started in mid Dec. I know there is alot of dispute about this programme and many people here have strong opinions about it. I'm a little nervous about posting this here for that reason.
After a year of agonising, reading this, that, and the other and getting hardly any help with his schooling, a new colleague started at work. This lady had a daughter who had undergone the programme and encouraged me to join up. Her daughter was diagnosed with Dyspraxia, Dyslexia and ADD, but is now happily mainstream. She had the same problems my son has.
From time to time I am going to post his progress (or lack of it).

Since staring, I have been cataloguing things that I have noticed, people will argue that these things could of happened anyway, that I'm reading to much into it, it's the pygmalion, placebo effect etc.

I am not here to debate, just to let people know what is happening one way or the other.

Things I have noticed:-

Within a few weeks -lots of new vocabulary still happening.

within 3 weeks fluency of reading, willingness to read more increasing (I link this to ease with eye tracking)

Lisping has stopped, pronounciation of words better. (Speech therapist was asked about this his at assessment in Nov and I was told "THIS HIS HOW CHILDREN TALK THESE DAYS, WE CAN'T HELP WITH THAT"). No longer do we get fis and fat or free and firteen, -this is helping with his spelling now as he can actually say the words he wants to spell.

Most importantly last night his teacher (who has no idea that he is doing the program) told me "in the last couple of weeks he has gained confidence, he is now interacting well with the other boys and he is listening more", previously he would sit quietly and look lost and confused. She tells me she has to tell him off for talking in the class, but is secretly quite pleased that she has to.

His maths is no problem overall (worded problems are), he is reading above his age (although I can see he still works hard at decoding those words), he is now finding spelling easier (he was 2years behind in Feb), all words he has had problems with are being taught to him (by me) and they seem to be sticking.

His biggest problem is listening in the classroom while the teacher talks and organising his thoughts to get them back out onto paper, dysgraphia. These have not improved but it is early days on the programme. His teacher is fighting to get him 1:1 since Nov, but the Headteacher is dragging her feet as this money would have to come from the school budget.

This is our story to date, please don't slate me for it, as I am only trying to give everyone an insight into the program and I find it helps me to share my experience as all parents and sufferers can appreciate.

#2 ~ dolfrog ~

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 10:56 AM

Hi Lesley

If the Dore Program work for your son then you have found the program that works for your son, and thee is nothing wrong with that.
The only problem I have with the Dore program is that it is marketed as being the cure for all dyslexics, which it is not and no single program can be due the nature of the conflicting nature of the range of coping strategies many different groups of dyslexics need.
Your son is now getting some of the individual attention he needs, which is the same for whatever program you use, but If your son has listening problems then that will not be helped by the Dore program.

I hope your son continues to improve, then this is the right program for your son, but this should not have to be trial and error, all who have dyslexic issues should have a clinical diagnosis of all their issues, and the program providors should define which issues that their programs address, no one program can address all the issues that can cause dyslexia. All these programs work for some dyslexics but none work for all dyslexics, and all the programs have the benefit of providing a level of individual attention missing in the education system.
So beware of the so called instant improvement effect, sometimes this can be short lived, as the real underlying problems may not being addressed, or the new coping strategies need to be revised to cope with new tasks. This happens with many remedial programs not just for dyslexics and not just Dore. There is another program which has not been so readily available in the UK, FastForWord, which is now being marketed under the Nueron Banner, which in the late 1990s was marketed as the cure for Auditory Processing Disorder, but has since proved to work for only some who have APD but not all, The science behind the FastForWord is not disputed as it was ground breaking at the time, but they failed to report all the failures in their research papers, which was later discovered by other university researchers, so that they could sell their product. Because they did not define which causes of APD their program works for, and Dore has used similar marketing techniques and strategies


Best of Luck and I hope it works for your son.


best wishes

dolfrog




Hi , I have been posting here for over a year now. I decided to put my son on the Dore Programme, he started in mid Dec. I know there is alot of dispute about this programme and many people here have strong opinions about it. I'm a little nervous about posting this here for that reason.
After a year of agonising, reading this, that, and the other and getting hardly any help with his schooling, a new colleague started at work. This lady had a daughter who had undergone the programme and encouraged me to join up. Her daughter was diagnosed with Dyspraxia, Dyslexia and ADD, but is now happily mainstream. She had the same problems my son has.
From time to time I am going to post his progress (or lack of it).

Since staring, I have been cataloguing things that I have noticed, people will argue that these things could of happened anyway, that I'm reading to much into it, it's the pygmalion, placebo effect etc.

I am not here to debate, just to let people know what is happening one way or the other.

Things I have noticed:-

Within a few weeks -lots of new vocabulary still happening.

within 3 weeks fluency of reading, willingness to read more increasing (I link this to ease with eye tracking)

Lisping has stopped, pronounciation of words better. (Speech therapist was asked about this his at assessment in Nov and I was told "THIS HIS HOW CHILDREN TALK THESE DAYS, WE CAN'T HELP WITH THAT"). No longer do we get fis and fat or free and firteen, -this is helping with his spelling now as he can actually say the words he wants to spell.

Most importantly last night his teacher (who has no idea that he is doing the program) told me "in the last couple of weeks he has gained confidence, he is now interacting well with the other boys and he is listening more", previously he would sit quietly and look lost and confused. She tells me she has to tell him off for talking in the class, but is secretly quite pleased that she has to.

His maths is no problem overall (worded problems are), he is reading above his age (although I can see he still works hard at decoding those words), he is now finding spelling easier (he was 2years behind in Feb), all words he has had problems with are being taught to him (by me) and they seem to be sticking.

His biggest problem is listening in the classroom while the teacher talks and organising his thoughts to get them back out onto paper, dysgraphia. These have not improved but it is early days on the programme. His teacher is fighting to get him 1:1 since Nov, but the Headteacher is dragging her feet has this money would have to come from the school budget.

This is our story to date, please don't slate me for it, as I am only trying to give everyone an insight into the program and I find it helps me to share my experience as all parents and sufferers can appreciate.



#3 ~ lesley ~

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 12:27 PM

Hi Dolfrog

Your son is now getting some of the individual attention he needs, which is the same for whatever program you use, but If your son has listening problems then that will not be helped by the Dore program.


My son already has much individual attention in school and out of school, he has a lot more attention than my older son ever had, simply because of his difficulties. Dore has no proof that it can help specifically with listening, but equally you have no proof that it can't. It has already enabled my son to have conversations with his peers that were not happening before, because he couldn't keep up with the banter. I keep an open mind.



I hope your son continues to improve, then this is the right program for your son, but this should not have to be trial and error, all who have dyslexic issues should have a clinical diagnosis of all their issues, and the program providors should define which issues that their programs address, no one program can address all the issues that can cause dyslexia. All these programs work for some dyslexics but none work for all dyslexics, and all the programs have the benefit of providing a level of individual attention missing in the education system.


I agree, but this simply is not going to happen at this point in time, I hope to carry on with the path to 1 stop assessment centres even though this will not happen in time for my son. My son's teacher already gives him more attention than others in the class, she is constantly monitoring him and is sat with him if he needs it.

Thanks for your warm wishes.

#4 ~ dolfrog ~

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 01:07 PM

Hi lesley
______________________________
Dore has no proof that it can help specifically with listening, but equally you have no proof that it can't
_________________________________

If The Dore program could help with listening then the Medical Research Councils Institute of Hearing Research, would have included it in their research program, but The UK APD Steering Committee, who advise the MRC etc on amtters APD have never cosnsidered the Dore program to be able to remediate Auditory Processing Disorder, Auditory Processing is the medical term for listening.
May be I should explain there is a big difference between processing language and processing all the sound input that you hear. And listening is about processing all the sound input you hear. Processing langauge does have a listening component but there are many other factors as well.
May be you should report this to the Institute of Hearing Research at Nottingham University so that they can include this in their APD research program

best wishes

dolfrog

Hi Dolfrog
My son already has much individual attention in school and out of school, he has a lot more attention than my older son ever had, simply because of his difficulties. have conversations with his peers that were not happening before, because he couldn't keep up with the bante Dore has no proof that it can help specifically with listening, but equally you have no proof that it can't. It has already enabled my son to r. I keep an open mind.
I agree, but this simply is not going to happen at this point in time, I hope to carry on with the path to 1 stop assessment centres even though this will not happen in time for my son. My son's teacher already gives him more attention than others in the class, she is constantly monitoring him and is sat with him if he needs it.

Thanks for your warm wishes.



#5 ~ lesley ~

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 02:57 PM

I totally respect your point of view Dolfrog. I just want to share this, I don't want to push my opinions on anyone.
Thanks




Hi lesley
______________________________
Dore has no proof that it can help specifically with listening, but equally you have no proof that it can't
_________________________________

If The Dore program could help with listening then the Medical Research Councils Institute of Hearing Research, would have included it in their research program, but The UK APD Steering Committee, who advise the MRC etc on amtters APD have never cosnsidered the Dore program to be able to remediate Auditory Processing Disorder, Auditory Processing is the medical term for listening.
May be I should explain there is a big difference between processing language and processing all the sound input that you hear. And listening is about processing all the sound input you hear. Processing langauge does have a listening component but there are many other factors as well.
May be you should report this to the Institute of Hearing Research at Nottingham University so that they can include this in their APD research program

best wishes

dolfrog



#6 geodob

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Posted 14 March 2007 - 08:38 AM

Hi Lesley,
I can fully appreciate the position that you are coming from.
Though real problem, is that Dore needs to be separated from the Program?
Where the Program has simply adopted publicly available research into Educational Developmental Kinesiology.
Which other companies such as BrainGym and LearningBreakThrough have also adopted.

Where the only difference between them, is the amount of money spent on Marketing.

Where they use the same basic exercises to develop the same brain connectivity.

Which could be simply explained in a $10 book.
Along with a Wobble Board for $50.

The basic problem, is that Learning Difficulties are seen as Billion Dollar Industry, instead of a Billion People!

Geoff,

#7 ~ bubbles ~

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 10:19 AM

Hi Lesley,
I can fully appreciate the position that you are coming from.
Though real problem, is that Dore needs to be separated from the Program?
Where the Program has simply adopted publicly available research into Educational Developmental Kinesiology.
Which other companies such as BrainGym and LearningBreakThrough have also adopted.

Where the only difference between them, is the amount of money spent on Marketing.

Where they use the same basic exercises to develop the same brain connectivity.

Which could be simply explained in a $10 book.
Along with a Wobble Board for $50.

The basic problem, is that Learning Difficulties are seen as Billion Dollar Industry, instead of a Billion People!

Geoff,


Geoff,

Almost seven years ago I went through the Dore programme I was 16 at the time, since the age of 8 i had received specialist help in school and elsewhere. There is no doubt in my mind that the Dore programme has completely transformed who i am and my competence in life.

The exercises may seem simple, yet it is clear the concept behind it not, if it were why wouldn't schools have minimised the amount of people suffering perviously? I can appreciate and understand peoples' scepticism as in all honesty I was scepticle and so were my parents. For a chance to live life and not suffer through life being inhibited by not being able to hold a conversation, member a list or even just read a book, at the time it was a risk definately worth taking.

There is so much research now on how successful the programme is. The programme is actually different for each individual depending on where their problems lie. I can only think that for those the programme doesn't help they are not compliant with the needs of the programme, (exercises twice a day, everyday).

I truely believe that anyone who is suffering in the same manner I was should take the opportunity that Dore is offering so that they can have their chance in life to live like everyone else. I love life now, I am now at university obtaining 1st class marks and it gives me no greater pleasure when other people ask me for help as for so many years I never even dreamt of being in the position I am now in. I appreciate that I am only one case, but just by looking on there website it is clear there is an abundance.

all the best

#8 geodob

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Posted 16 March 2007 - 09:19 AM

Hi Bubbles,
I'm really happy that it is helped you.
Though my point is that their is nothing unique about Dore.
What is unique, is the growing body of international research into Developmental Educational Kinesiology.
Which companies such as Dore, Braingym and LearningBreakThrough, have simply adopted.

Where I would like to see Developmental Educational Kinesiology as an area of research, promoted. Instead of these companies.
Which should become the basis of Sport or Physical Education in all schools!
Geoff,

#9 ~ lesley ~

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Posted 05 April 2007 - 01:50 PM

Just to let you know I have a blog running and if anybody would like to view it, please drop me a PM.

#10 ~ lesley ~

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Posted 23 April 2007 - 09:41 AM

Just like to report that Matthew is telling us about his school day now every day, things that people say, lessons, what happening next week/ term. I asked him how his listening was these days. He looked at me strangely and said "Ohh that's waaaay better", as if to say "why are asking me about that now". Listening was one of the things he was most worried about along with copying off the board and writing.

Writing still very poor, he knows what he wants to put on paper, can even spell most words, it's just the act of getting all the processes of remembering what he wants to put down, spelling and writing, together to put on the paper.

#11 ~ lesley ~

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Posted 13 July 2007 - 08:58 AM

This is the only place I haven't posted this piece of news, so I can't really leave it out. I thought I had better share it here as well.

Matthew had a speech and languge review this pm. His Dad took him as I couldn't get time off.
Matthew went in, she asked what he had been doing, he chatted for a while about Dore- the exercises that help your brain, and get you to read faster. Then talked about his trip to Dan yr Ogaf caves and school.
He did the test a repeat of the inital test he did back last Nov. Then he had 26/50 indicating word finding problems, together with the talks she had with him back then (all ums and oohs and you knows). This time he had 46/50!!!
Matthew has been discharged from Speech and Language therapy.

The therapist was so amazed by Matthew's new found ability and concentration that she said "he's on Ritalin, right?"
WRONG!!

She commented she didn't need to see him again and you would never know he had had a problem! She could see no obvious explanation for the increased ability at such an accelerated rate, she was really puzzled. She had only ever seen a difference that marked after a child had been on meds. She had never heard of exercise based programmes. She knows now!!
This confirms the leap on Verbal IQ from 83 to 98 WISC IV redone in July 2007 Inital one in March '06.


His reading (decoding) has gone from 6.6 to 10.4 (March 06 to July 07)
Spelling 6.6 to 8.0.
He does not read fluently and accurately, but we have a long way still to go.

#12 ~ crystalsapphire ~

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 12:10 AM

im currently on the dore program. Started in march. Im at the age of 18 and always had help. Yet i believed i wouldnt be able to go university my coursework in college always had to be redone as presentation and spelling. yet im trying it out . the only one think i disagree with is saying its a cure for its not that.

#13 ~ Janis Harris ~

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 01:25 PM

Hi , I have been posting here for over a year now. I decided to put my son on the Dore Programme, he started in mid Dec. I know there is alot of dispute about this programme and many people here have strong opinions about it. I'm a little nervous about posting this here for that reason.
After a year of agonising, reading this, that, and the other and getting hardly any help with his schooling, a new colleague started at work. This lady had a daughter who had undergone the programme and encouraged me to join up. Her daughter was diagnosed with Dyspraxia, Dyslexia and ADD, but is now happily mainstream. She had the same problems my son has.
From time to time I am going to post his progress (or lack of it).

Since staring, I have been cataloguing things that I have noticed, people will argue that these things could of happened anyway, that I'm reading to much into it, it's the pygmalion, placebo effect etc.

I am not here to debate, just to let people know what is happening one way or the other.

Things I have noticed:-

Within a few weeks -lots of new vocabulary still happening.

within 3 weeks fluency of reading, willingness to read more increasing (I link this to ease with eye tracking)

Lisping has stopped, pronounciation of words better. (Speech therapist was asked about this his at assessment in Nov and I was told "THIS HIS HOW CHILDREN TALK THESE DAYS, WE CAN'T HELP WITH THAT"). No longer do we get fis and fat or free and firteen, -this is helping with his spelling now as he can actually say the words he wants to spell.

Most importantly last night his teacher (who has no idea that he is doing the program) told me "in the last couple of weeks he has gained confidence, he is now interacting well with the other boys and he is listening more", previously he would sit quietly and look lost and confused. She tells me she has to tell him off for talking in the class, but is secretly quite pleased that she has to.

His maths is no problem overall (worded problems are), he is reading above his age (although I can see he still works hard at decoding those words), he is now finding spelling easier (he was 2years behind in Feb), all words he has had problems with are being taught to him (by me) and they seem to be sticking.

His biggest problem is listening in the classroom while the teacher talks and organising his thoughts to get them back out onto paper, dysgraphia. These have not improved but it is early days on the programme. His teacher is fighting to get him 1:1 since Nov, but the Headteacher is dragging her feet as this money would have to come from the school budget.

This is our story to date, please don't slate me for it, as I am only trying to give everyone an insight into the program and I find it helps me to share my experience as all parents and sufferers can appreciate.



#14 ~ Janis Harris ~

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 01:28 PM

Dore Experience - if you still feel that the school is failing write to the chair of governors. But first you must speak to your Special Needs Co-ordinator I know that funds are a bit slim in all schools. Has he had a statement have you had him assessed privately we did this for our daugther who was then diagnosed with dyslexia/dyscalculia - people do not understand that have "normal" children. Push, push and push even more you can only do this for your child in he/she's short life at school. Do not leave it until secondary school do it right now - go even further by writing to your MP.!!!!

#15 ~ lesley ~

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:26 AM

Thanks very much for that my son is now getting 1:1 5 hrs a week and a 1hour group once a week but the 1:1 is a Teachers aid at the moment they are trying to get a proper LS assisant for him. I can't expect any more help at school and basically that is not enough to get him up with his peers. The thing is without my support with reading and spelling at home he would be nowhere near where he is now he would have dropped back even futher I really fear for those children with no help at home. I would much prefer to leave it to the school and go back to being just a mum but that would be a disaster.

Recently and thankfully he has gone story mad, audio books are playing alot I'm are reading to him which he could not grasp at all until the last 3 months ago so we are advancing all the time, writing is the biggest bugbear as well as no real fluent reading, we plod on.


Dore Experience - if you still feel that the school is failing write to the chair of governors. But first you must speak to your Special Needs Co-ordinator I know that funds are a bit slim in all schools. Has he had a statement have you had him assessed privately we did this for our daugther who was then diagnosed with dyslexia/dyscalculia - people do not understand that have "normal" children. Push, push and push even more you can only do this for your child in he/she's short life at school. Do not leave it until secondary school do it right now - go even further by writing to your MP.!!!!



#16 ~ Barn ~

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 09:00 PM

Hi Lesley,

I'm new to this forum and have just being reading through your experiences with Dore. My daughter is also undertaking the programme and we too have noticed astounding results. Like many, I was exteremely skeptical of the programme to begin with.
Over a space of only a few months, I have watched my daughters confidence soar. She is now willing to read of her own accord, with no prompting ( prior to this she just wouldn't entertain the notion that she could read to herself or siblings). Her written work has improved three fold and the terrible night terrors which she has suffered from since the age of around 18 mths have disappeared.
School has been a nightmare for us as parents. We first voiced our concerns regarding her reversal of letters and numbers, along with quite a few other indicators in her first year at primary school. I was advised be her teacher not to worry too much at this early stage - and I quote ' if a chair is the wrong way round, it's still a chair after all'. I was left gobsmacked!!!!!! I know my daughter well enough to realise that her writing and reading and number skills are leading to frustration on her part - she has a great vocabulary and comprehension - it just wasn't translating onto paper.
Years two and thre haven't been much better with regards to her schooling. She was taken out of her regular class twice a week and put into a move class. Apparently this is some attempt at brain gym. This led to her becoming quite withdrawn. She started finding excuses and feigning illness so that she wouldn't have to go to school. She felt as though she was odd and not smart like the other kids. It broke my heart to see my intelligent wee lass falling apart and I felt powerless to help.
Now, entering her fourth year at primary, and thanks to Dore, she understands that she isn't different or stupid. I'm having the move classes at school discontinued as they were of no benefit what so ever and actually seemed to add to her low self esteem.
At last, the school have appointed and educational psychologist so we might actually be getting some where!!!
I would recommend Dore to anyone in a similar situation.

#17 ~ lesley ~

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Posted 22 August 2007 - 04:22 PM

Welcome Barn, we are delighted with progress so far, and believe it to be money well spent, as I said we will post more progress as it happens, watch this space! :D (8months in) How long have you been going?

#18 ~ lesley ~

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Posted 22 August 2007 - 04:30 PM

im currently on the dore program. Started in march. Im at the age of 18 and always had help. Yet i believed i wouldnt be able to go university my coursework in college always had to be redone as presentation and spelling. yet im trying it out . the only one think i disagree with is saying its a cure for its not that.


I agree it's not a cure, my son has not got an illness that needs curing, he just needs help on the problem of reading and writing. A man made problem. Dore is just one thing that is helping him, that alone would not help him, it's just one side of things. He obviously needs all the teaching that he has missed out on, repeated and reinforced and it will help to deal with our modern world.
He sort of has jumped a era in learning (reading and writing) and gone straight for the age of technology.

#19 ~ Barn ~

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 02:03 PM

Hi Lesley,
Our daughter started on the programme about six months ago and I too agree.. it's the best money we've ever spent!!
It's great to hear how other people are finding it.. so please keep posting.. we can compare notes lol!!

Barn x

#20 ~ lesley ~

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Posted 28 November 2007 - 10:08 AM

Just to report in, Matthew was tested by a new LSA for reading and spelling. He now reads age appropriatley i.e 9.6 years in English. LSA comments he is heavily decoding but comprehension is good. In the same test 2 yrs ago he tested -24 months.
Spelling still -12 months, but improving at a fast rate (previously -24 months 2 yrs ago). Self esteem/ Confidence is bouncing! Getting thoughts on paper is steadily improving, which is his biggest problem these days.




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