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Being Bullied At Work


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#1 ~ jess ~

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 09:24 PM

i am being bulied at work by y boss not constantly but most of time dont know what to do.its my dyslexia cause i make stupid mistakess and it gets me into trouble i have given her a copy of my report for dyslexia and the comments still keep flying.
just dont know what to do its really knocked my confidence for 6!jess

#2 ~ dolfrog ~

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 10:01 PM

Hi Jess

A first step would be to book an apointment with the Disability Advisor at your local JobCentrePlus. Disability Advisors can mediate between disabled employees and employers, provided you have always kept your employer informed of your dyslexic issues.
This will also help your case if you have to leave your job for one reason or another.

You could also contactthe Human Rights Commission (old Disability Discrimiation commission merged with other discrimination organisations) and describe your case and ask for any legal advice that may help you with your employer regarding disability discrimiation in the work place.

Hope this helps

besty wishes

dolfrog

i am being bulied at work by y boss not constantly but most of time dont know what to do.its my dyslexia cause i make stupid mistakess and it gets me into trouble i have given her a copy of my report for dyslexia and the comments still keep flying.
just dont know what to do its really knocked my confidence for 6!jess



#3 Sam

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 10:07 PM

Hey Jess,

Sorry to hear you are having problems at work - it's not acceptable in any shape or form and your employer is breaking the law if they are discriminating against you (as long as you have declared your dyslexia, which it sounds like you have).

Here's a really useful article on your rights:
http://www.beingdysl...ination-act.php

And also if you feel you need further advice specifically relating to the Disability Descrimination Act here are a list of groups that can provide legal advice:
http://www.beingdysl...ct-contacts.php

Other things that can help include having an open an honest conversation with your employer about how you are feeling. If this can't be resolved reasonably the law is on your side. But it's always important to try and work with your employer, together so that you can resolve the issues together.

Let us know how you get on, if you take any further action I'd love to hear the companies name - I'd really like to start naming and shaming employers that do this!

Cheers,
Sam
Sam
Founder Being Dyslexic
"Being dyslexic is being someone amazing"

#4 ~ Gattaca ~

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 11:29 PM

You’re not alone Jess. I’m in trouble myself; and Petal posted just yesterday that she was going through something similar.
http://www.beingdysl...?showtopic=4643
It’s really quite disturbing…
How many more of us are there going through this?
Is the bullying formal or informal? I mean are they threatening or hinting that you might get the sack if you continue to make mistakes? Or are they just being overly critical and undermining your confidence? I only ask because it might make a difference on how you handle the situation.

The only advice I can give is what I’ve done myself…
Make your employer aware that you know about and are covered by the Disability Discrimination Act. Be proactive in confronting your employer about their comments and problems you experience--put them on the defensive as much as possible. Asked for a work placed assessment by an occupational therapist. The occupational therapist can recommend reasonable accommodations that your employer should be able to make for you.

Dolfrog makes a couple of good suggestions; I haven’t tried either of those--but I shall be giving them a go.

Take Care Jess,
Kind regards,
Your friend Steve (G)

#5 ~ dolfrog ~

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Posted 23 January 2009 - 11:58 PM

Hi Jess and Steve

when I went through this the 2005 Disability discriminationACT had not come into force.
I went through 6 years of Disability Discrimination in the Work place.
I could not afford to leave my job, the first problem would have been no benefits to help feed and hose my family for 6 months because i would have left my job voluntarily.
So I had to wait for my escape from discrimiation when I was offered Redundancy, when they closed my local branch of the company. Going through the redundancy process was when i first suffered from Post Traumatic Stress (PTS), which was caused by years of stress due to discrimination. I still get reminders and have a the odd attack of PTS.

The next problem was now trying to find a new job. I had been incontact with the JobCentrePlus Disability Advisor, who understood the problems I had faced, and we began to try to work out career options which best fit my skills and the nature of my deficits, and try to get the accomodations i need in the work place. AS can be seen by the Work Psychologist report http://www.beingdysl...?showtopic=2161 I have some conflicting skills and deficits.
after some 4 years I have finally found a support agency who help the disabled find work, that really wants to understand me, bothj my strengths and weaknesses, and we are aiming for waht they term the taster apprach to finding employment, where by both you and the employer try eqach other try each other out, and the support agency which is provided by the Local authority will always be in the background to help out if there are any problems in the future.

best wishes

Graeme
dolfrog

You’re not alone Jess. I’m in trouble myself; and Petal posted just yesterday that she was going through something similar.
http://www.beingdysl...?showtopic=4643
It’s really quite disturbing…
How many more of us are there going through this?
Is the bullying formal or informal? I mean are they threatening or hinting that you might get the sack if you continue to make mistakes? Or are they just being overly critical and undermining your confidence? I only ask because it might make a difference on how you handle the situation.

The only advice I can give is what I’ve done myself…
Make your employer aware that you know about and are covered by the Disability Discrimination Act. Be proactive in confronting your employer about their comments and problems you experience--put them on the defensive as much as possible. Asked for a work placed assessment by an occupational therapist. The occupational therapist can recommend reasonable accommodations that your employer should be able to make for you.

Dolfrog makes a couple of good suggestions; I haven’t tried either of those--but I shall be giving them a go.

Take Care Jess,
Kind regards,
Your friend Steve (G)



#6 Sam

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 09:05 AM

Hey,

Dolfrog makes some very valid comments above, but try to stay positivie, there's a good chance you can resolve this in a friednly manner with your boss and all work together happily in the future! :)

Cheers,
Sam
Sam
Founder Being Dyslexic
"Being dyslexic is being someone amazing"

#7 ~ Gattaca ~

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 10:41 AM

Yeah I think any response should be proportionate to the amount and type of trouble we’re in. If it’s a single individual making our life difficult a well placed word is often enough to sort matters; if on the other hand the bullying is more institutionalised then a more procedural approach might be more appropriate--perhaps something relating to trade unions and the DDA.
And of course (assuming we don’t get forced out or leave the job) we’re going to have the work with these people in the future. So we should try to deal with things sensitively.

#8 ~ lomo ~

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 05:53 PM

i would try to ignore the odd comment now and then if you can and get on with the job. these things can be a bit of a self feeding cycle of despair, if you at least get try to better at your job, even stay behind to catch up at the start of of a new job, you can give yourself a personal in built confidence, which gives you self reassurance. the comments are probably hurtful because you think that they are true. may be try to ask a nuetral person if there is some element of truth in the nasty comments. if there is well maybe see what they suggest to improve as well.

don't just accept those nasty comments tho because you probably have lots of other wonderful skills that round you off quite nicely..

am with everyone else, tread carefully when it comes to paperwork and the official route, use it only as a last resort..

hope this helps

lomo



i am being bulied at work by y boss not constantly but most of time dont know what to do.its my dyslexia cause i make stupid mistakess and it gets me into trouble i have given her a copy of my report for dyslexia and the comments still keep flying.
just dont know what to do its really knocked my confidence for 6!jess



#9 ~ Gattaca ~

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 06:35 PM

I’ve started staying late to catch up and do that little bit extra to appear more efficient. But we shouldn’t have to do this--not if we’ve worked hard during the day; why should we stay late? We have a life outside of work just like anyone else.
I don’t think in matters whether there’s truth in the nasty comments or not. If someone has an issue with our performance then they should address their concerns to us in a professional manner; things shouldn’t be allowed to get personal.

#10 ~ dolfrog ~

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 06:39 PM

Hi Steve

In my own case I was able to get along fine with my immedicate working peers, the problems arose when the mamgers changed on an annual basis.
The first mamaner who employed me understood that I was dyslexic, but it was the third plu mangers who began to cause the problems together with Regional Managers and the Human Resources Departments. During this time I was discovering more about and being diagnosed as having Auditory Processing Disorder which is the underlying cause of my dyslexic symptoms. And this all happened before the 2005 Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) came into force, so employers were more able to get away with this type of discrimination.
The problem was that I was a very small dysfunctional cog in a very big machine, and small cogs are easy to replace.


Things have now changed for the better, the 2005 DDA is now legally binding on all employers, and part of the 2005 DDA was the requirement for all public Service Providers to have a Disability Eqality Duty (DED) policy in place to demonstrate that they are actively trying to accomodate the disabled. Schools were given more time to comply with these requirements, but their extra time has now expired so thye should all now compoly with these DED requirements.

There is now more support for individuals in the work place and to help finding work. The JobCentreplus Disability Advisors can act as mediators between individuals and employers when in work. Thye can also act as mentors when finding work and help with any disability related problems after you have found a job.
Each Local authority has to provide a support program to help the disabled find work which envolved many different types of support according to the individuals needs, the best option for dyslexics is the TASTER option when you feel you could do a job well, but your dyslexia could be a problems if not properly understood by you employer and immediate managers. It is a two sided trail to see if you like the job and the employer, and the if the employer like you.
If you take the job the the support remains in place if you need help; say if a new task is introduced to your job defintion, a new manager becomes your boss, or your accomodations are not being met.

Companies who are part of a scheme to help disabled people gain employment ususally have TWO TICKS on their Job Adverts and compamy stationary. This can be useful when making preparations for the first interview.

best wishes

dolfrog


Yeah I think any response should be proportionate to the amount and type of trouble we’re in. If it’s a single individual making our life difficult a well placed word is often enough to sort matters; if on the other hand the bullying is more institutionalised then a more procedural approach might be more appropriate--perhaps something relating to trade unions and the DDA.
And of course (assuming we don’t get forced out or leave the job) we’re going to have the work with these people in the future. So we should try to deal with things sensitively.



#11 ~ Gattaca ~

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 06:49 PM

Thanks for the info dolfrog...very useful.
I think I need to start exploring a few of those ideas.
Thanks again. :)

#12 ~ lomo ~

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 08:48 PM

gattaca

i'm sure me and you aren't so disimilar but you seem to have changed your tone mid thread. firstly you were advocating building a relationship with your colleagues but now you seem to be converging on the litigious solution, so which is it? :whistling:

if you'ld care to read my thread again and compare it against what you just said there isn't a whole lot of difference but you seem to be yanking my chain, so i'll yank yours back if thats ok with you.

staying late shouldn't be something you do long term, but a common trait of dyslexia is the time its takes for us to catch on, so just for a while am advocating a little extra effort to stay ahead of the curve. then when things settle in to a nice routine just get back to normal hours.

i wasn't trying to justify use of nasty comments, merely that a negative reaction as opposed to instant rejection/shrug off can grind you down, because part of you might feel there is some truth to them, so am advocating getting a friendly/neutral voice to run past the comments and see if there is anything in them, if not, next you see them give them some crap, if there is something in them, work on it and when you've conquered the issued, give them some crap. either way, you get to give them some crap.. just don't sit on it. :D

of course professional behaviour can be good and i always try to be polite, however, when faced with what i assume to be a little ribbing, fight a little fire with fire.. ahem and i quote..

Yeah I think any response should be proportionate to the amount and type of trouble we’re in.


:whistling:

lomo


I’ve started staying late to catch up and do that little bit extra to appear more efficient. But we shouldn’t have to do this--not if we’ve worked hard during the day; why should we stay late? We have a life outside of work just like anyone else.
I don’t think in matters whether there’s truth in the nasty comments or not. If someone has an issue with our performance then they should address their concerns to us in a professional manner; things shouldn’t be allowed to get personal.



#13 ~ Gattaca ~

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Posted 24 January 2009 - 11:14 PM

*Sigh*
Lomo,
I apologise if you feel I was ‘yanking your chain’--this wasn’t my intention. :unsure:
I don’t disagree with anything you’ve said…
My posts might seem contradictory; but I think there’s a balance to be struck. We have to be tactful and sensitive; but also not let people take advantage of us.
Once again apologies if my comments caused offence--I could have phrased them better.
I think in the first post I was speaking from the head; and in the second from the heart. If it’s any consolation…I confuse myself just as much as I do other people. :whistling:

#14 ~ lomo ~

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 11:31 AM

*mmm* :whistling:

gattaca

am not offended by your comments, no apologies necessary.

back to the OP, i would suggest that we just try to deal with what i am assuming to be a little ribbing with a little crap back. (forget tactful and sensitive :D.)

during the whole of this thread i have been speaking from the point of view of a boiled cabbage. :whistling:

lomo





*Sigh*
Lomo,
I apologise if you feel I was ‘yanking your chain’--this wasn’t my intention. :unsure:
I don’t disagree with anything you’ve said…
My posts might seem contradictory; but I think there’s a balance to be struck. We have to be tactful and sensitive; but also not let people take advantage of us.
Once again apologies if my comments caused offence--I could have phrased them better.
I think in the first post I was speaking from the head; and in the second from the heart. If it’s any consolation…I confuse myself just as much as I do other people. :whistling:



#15 Womble

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 11:53 PM

Try being a teacher! I have to do a whole ton of stuff outside of school, every teacher has to do stuff outside of school. Workload is a massive reason for people leaving the profession.
Dyslexics of the world untie!

#16 ~ lomo ~

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 12:10 AM

Try being a teacher!


i'd sooner climb k2, but good luck with that.. am very happy with my calculator and scale rule thank you. would hate to see them get their grubby fingers all over them.

seems staying behind on occasion is part of a lot of jobs then?

lomo

#17 ~ Gattaca ~

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 08:56 AM

Try being a teacher! I have to do a whole ton of stuff outside of school, every teacher has to do stuff outside of school. Workload is a massive reason for people leaving the profession.

Yes, I think teachers shouldn’t be expected to do quite as much outside of school as they do. Not being able to leave our work--at our place of work--seems to be a common theme these day.




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